Saturday, October 25, 2014

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

I'd say I don't remember the last time I read a young-adult book, only I do. Just the other day: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. I liked it, maybe a little more than I'd expected, enough to read in one sitting. So I read a book by an author who so often gets mentioned in the same breath as John Green. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell is another YA book that comes highly recommended. And this, I loved!

Summary: (from Amazon) Eleanor is the new girl in town, and she's never felt more alone. All mismatched clothes, mad red hair and chaotic home life, she couldn't stick out more if she tried. Then she takes the seat on the bus next to Park. Quiet, careful and, in Eleanor's eyes, impossibly cool, Park's worked out that flying under the radar is the best way to get by. Slowly, steadily, through late-night conversations and an ever-growing stack of mix tapes, Eleanor and Park fall in love. Set over the course of one school year in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits: smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

Rating: 3.5/5 - I only do ratings when the review is kind of a rant, and doesn't really make it clear just how exactly much I liked the book.

Bono met his wife in high school, Park says. 
So did Jerry Lee Lewis, Eleanor answers. 
I'm not kidding, he says
You should be, she says, we're 16. 
What about Romeo and Juliet? 
Shallow, confused, then dead. 
I love you, Park says. 
Wherefore art thou, Eleanor answers. 
I'm not kidding, he says. 
You should be.

My thoughts: The story is so cheesy. I know: it's got two misfits falling in love over a bunch of 80's songs, which they can't help quoting from every three seconds. There's a lot of gooey dialogue that made me roll my eyes for being just so... teen. Of course, my teenage years were some of the most ridiculous times of my life, where I did and said the craziest things and had high school smack me in the face a lot, so there were times when I felt the characters in the book just needed to grow up, already. All their immaturities and insecurities are frustrating and maudlin. But then that's the point, Eleanor & Park captures exactly what it is to be a teenager. Illogical and overloaded on touchy-feelies; even the smart kid sometimes thinks the stupidest things, the usually no-nonsense girl acts all silly around the boy she likes, even the biggest bully can abruptly turn nice. Anyone who asks for explanations has forgotten what it's like to be sixteen. 

Eleanor's real problems - her creepy step-dad, her abused careless mother, her must-wear-mens'-clothes poverty - and Park's troubles with his dad, who finds him too girly, are frequently taken somewhat casually. But it was this subtlety that I actually liked, the writer has this almost lighthearted way of dealing with and writing about big issues. I mean all the concerns stared me right in face. But I felt like Eleanor was doing the best she could when she sneaked out to meet Park in the middle of the night risking so much, because if it's ever justified to do something shallow, it's when you're a smitten sixteen-year old. I didn't expect Park to understand Eleanor's broken family or realize the extent of her troubles, because to him family meant something simpler; he had parents who were completely in love with other. Making rash decisions, not giving every action a thought is what kept them innocent teenagers, and Rowell lets them live in their little bubble, if only for a while. This makes their breakthrough moments even sweeter. A well written book manages to be dead serious without monologues of philosophizing. I think Rowell pulls it off.

The sentences are crisp, the dialogue snippy and the narration flits between Park and Eleanor. There are times when the point of view changes thrice on the same page, which is distracting and a little lazy, not much effort goes into seamlessly moving from scene to scene. Rowell does have an eye for detail and is a good describer, but she is awfully repetitive. (Red hair, red hair, freckles, big, Eleanor = not conventionally pretty.) It's a YA novel and probably couldn't resist its few typical gimmicks. Basically, I suppose it's no great work of literature (although, what is?, really) but it's a charming book. Worth a shot, at least.

A couple of favourite quotes (descriptions) that aren't snappy chit chat:

When Eleanor was a little girl, she'd thought her mom looked like a queen, like the star of some fairy tale. Not a princess – princesses are just pretty. Eleanor's mother was beautiful. She was tall and stately, with broad shoulders and an elegant waist. All of her bones seemed more purposeful than other people's. Like they weren't just there to hold her up, they were there to make a point.
Eleanor looked a lot like her. But not enough.
Eleanor looked like her mother through a fish tank. Rounder and softer. Slurred. Where her mother was statuesque, Eleanor was heavy. Where her mother was finely drawn, Eleanor was smudged.

(Eleanor, on herself)

But Park didn't have any luck – or status – to spare on that dumb redhead. He had just enough to keep himself out of trouble. And he knew it was crappy, but he was kind of grateful that people like that girl existed. Because people like Steve and Mikey and Tina existed, too, and they needed to be fed. If it wasn't that redhead, it was going to be somebody else. And if it wasn't somebody else, it was going to be Park.

(Park, initially, on being nice to Eleanor)

P.S. Here's a link to John Green's review of Eleanor & Park. Interesting, huh? Do you read any author reviews of books? I only trust recommendations that I find on Neil Gaiman's blog.

6 comments:

Delia D said...

I've heard good things about this book but YA is not really something I gravitate towards. As for author reviews of books, I take them with a grain of salt. Some may be ok, some not, nothing's set in stone.

Priya said...

Delia D - It used to be the same with me until now: I have very little free time, so breezy young-adult novels just don't seem as boring as they used to. This one's actually good, if you ever find yourself in the mood for YA!

ebookclassics said...

Wow, I didn't know some authors reviewed other books. I have been curious about Eleanor and Park, but wondered if it would be unbearably super cheesey.

Priya said...

ebookclassics - Well, it was super cheesy, but wasn't unbearable for me. ;)

nishitak said...

I am not very fond of YA, but so many reviewers are going gaga over Rainbow Rowell's books, it feels like I should try one at least. This sounds ok, but I am not sure about the super cheesy romance part.

Priya said...

Nishita - See, I'm not a fan of YA either so the stereotypes did bother me, like I said, the sickly sweet romance was a bit annoying. But it was entertaining and certainly well written! So as far as usual YA goes, this was great. Give it a go!

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