Sunday, July 6, 2014

Ransom by David Malouf

Reminiscent of: Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis

Summary: The Iliad begins with Achilles, the Greeks' greatest strength, refusing to fight for them, for Agamemnon, who insulted him. But he is the only one who can defeat the Trojan prince Hector. One of the greatest stories of The Iliad is Achilles' final vengeful slaughter of Hector, his darkest moments that follow, and King Priam's daring un-kingly attempt to ransom his son's body from the cruel Achilles. The unlikely meeting, of the aged father and the murderer of his son, in the middle of a Greek camp, at the centre of an unending war, makes a beautiful story of loss.

"If the last thing that happens to me is to be hunted down in the heart of my citadel, and dragged out by the feet, and shamelessly stripped and humiliated, so be it. But I do not want that to be the one sad image of me that endures in the minds of men. The image I mean to leave is a living one. Of something so new and unheard of that when men speak my name it will stand forever as proof of what I was. An act, in these terrible days, that even an old man can perform, that only an old man dare perform, of whom nothing now can be expected of noise and youthful swagger. Who can go humbly, as a father and as a man, to his son’s killer, and ask in the gods’ name, and in their sight, to be given back the body of his dead son. Lest the honour of all men be trampled in the dust.’'

My thoughts: So: did I mention I've been on kind of a Troy-high lately? I'm halfway through the Robert Fitzgerald translation of The Iliad and have been catching up on my Greek mythology; reading novels based on the Trojan war, because there's no better way to learn stuff than through stories. Last week, I wrote about The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. It's a book full of glamour and passion, but this book is the complete opposite. I'd read and appreciated Ransom by David Malouf before, but this reread has me inspired. This book is amazing. Brilliantly composed. 

The author adds character to the myth, life stories and feelings. We see Achilles in the ruthlessness that even he can't comprehend. Angry and impulsive Achilles who leaves the war, then rejoins it to avenge his friend's murder, kills Hector and mercilessly drags around his bones for days to follow. But he's burning inside; even as the Myrmidons begin to resent their leader's bold cruelty, we find him not cruel, but pitiful.

And then we see Priam, ransomed from slavery by his sister through Heracles, we meet his sons and daughters and Hecuba, his Queen. Ransom is about a King - a symbol - and about the man behind that image, a man who finally breaks through to do right by his son. In a time when all was left to the will of the Gods, we see the one man who took fate in his hands, a ruler who exercised his free will and set out to plead to his enemy, Priam who put his life in the hands of chance. Guided by Hermes, in a cart drawn by mules, belonging to a poor stranger, Priam sees the real Troy for the first time. 

And the story is also about the cart driver, a stranger who is hired to play the part of Priam's herald for one journey, an old man whose views about the world make all the difference to Priam's actions, an old man who witnesses in one night a great chunk of history and, throughout his life, even after the fall of Troy, retells it to a thousand disbelieving ears. His presence in this novella makes you wonder about stories and the true truth. It reminded me of Odysseus's speech in The Song of Achilles about how there is no telling who earns immortal fame and whose glory is lost in time.

Masterfully written, Ransom by David Malouf is packed with wit and emotion. It's 5/5, incredibly highly recommended.

In his own world a man spoke only to give shape to a decision he had come to, or to lay out an argument for or against. To offer thanks to one who had done well, or a reproof, either in anger or gentle regret, to one who had not. To pay a compliment whose decorative phrases, and appeals to vanity or family pride, were fixed and of ancient and approved form. Silence, not speech, was what was expressive. Power lay in containment. In keeping hidden, and therefore mysterious, one’s true intent. A child might prattle, till it learned better. Or women in the seclusion of their own apartments.

But out here, if you stopped to listen, everything prattled. It was a prattling world. Leaves as they tumbled in the breeze. Water as it went hopping over the stones and turned back on itself and hopped again. Cicadas that created such a long racketing shrillness, then suddenly cut out, so that you found yourself aware once again of silence. Except that it wasn't silence at all, it was a low, continuous rustling and buzzing and humming, as if each thing’s presence was as much the sound it made as its shape, or the way it had, which was all its own, of moving or being still.

4 comments:

harish p i said...

I will try this out. Speaking of Troy never ever try watching the movie with the same name, if you have not seen it yet. I watched it a decade back and still that bitter taste has not went out.

Priya said...

Yes, Harish I've seen that movie! ;P There was a History Channel movie on Helen of Troy which originally sparked my interest in the myth. But I'm almost ashamed to say I liked the Troy movie back then, if only for Brad Pitt. Though I am pretty sure I wouldn't like it if I saw it again.

DMS said...

How have I not heard of this one? I love mythology and this sounds like a book I will love. Your review touched on so many things that intrigue me about the story and I have definitely added it to my list. Can't wait to pick it up! Thanks for sharing.
~Jess

Priya said...

Jess - I'm sure you'll find this book lovely. :)

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