Tuesday, October 1, 2013

The Thing in the Forest by A.S. Byatt

Little Black Book of Stories tells five tales, which blend the ordinary with the absurd. The collection opens with a perfectly intriguing story, about the blurred edges of reality, called The Thing in the Forest.

It is the story of two girls, Penny and Primrose. It is set during the WWII, when children are evacuated from London to the country. The girls, who have nothing in common, other than this shared exclusion from the world, meet on the train and deciding to stick together, become friends.

At the estate, when the children are free to do as they please, Penny and Primrose decide to explore the forest. In it, they see, or think they see, a thing. A huge slimy worm-like creature right out of a nightmare. It doesn't harm them and they never speak of it again. But this sudden exposure to the uncanny, the evil changes the girls forever. Each finds her own way to deal with the loss of childhood innocence till their paths cross again, and the women meet in the very forest years later.

"They remembered the thing they had seen in the forest in the way you remember those very few dreams - almost all nightmares - which have the quality of life itself, not of fantasm, or shifting provisional scene-set. (Though what are dreams if not life itself?) In the memory, as in such a dream, they felt, I cannot get out, this is a real thing in a real place."

"I think, I think there are things that are real - more real than we are - but mostly we don't cross their paths, or they don't cross ours. Maybe at very bad times we get into their world, or notice what they are doing in ours."

Ever since I read Elementals: Stories of Fire and Ice, I've been in awe of A.S. Byatt's wordsmithery. Even in this story, she paints vivid pictures with her prose. Her writing prods each of our senses. She has a way with colours, describing darkness as nothing but the colour of ink and elephant; contrasting the golden and darkly shadowed light in the woods with the light in city terraces, and naming toadstools, some scarlet, some ghostly-pale and some a dead-flesh purple. With a delightfully rich imagination, Byatt describes feelings that run over our skin, pricking and twitching; primroses that smell of thin, clear, spring honey without the buzz of summer; and Penny, in the woods, hearing a tremulous shiver in the darkness, and her own heartbeat in the thickening brown air. But the vivid detailing is, appropriately, only part of the charm.

Like in Ragnarok, in this story, Byatt portrays children just as they are: naughty and innocent, with more understanding than any adult could fathom, imaginative, curious and daring and having their own personal reality. The story weaves together themes of war, innocence, dreams, faith, dealing with loss, grief and finding our place in the world. It's a coming-of-age story; slightly too abstract, perhaps, to appeal to all; but worth reading.

Byatt's works are categorized as fantasy, but seem to me to be a genre-defying combination of magic realism, naturalism and gothic horror. The Thing in the Forest and two other stories from the collection, The Stone Woman and The Pink Ribbon, have a blatantly mythic, supernatural element. The Stone Woman is a bit too vague for my taste, but will be adored by geology and Icelandic mythology enthusiasts. The Pink Ribbon is about a man who is haunted by a sort of memory of his wife, who now has Alzheimer's. The other two stories, Body Art and Raw Material, not fantasy nor horror, portray the tragic mundane of our lives with overwhelming honestly. Together, the five stories form another great read by (and, possibly, a nice introduction to) my favourite short story writer.

Reviewed for Peril of the Short Story - the R.I.P. Challenge.

4 comments:

Viktoria Berg said...

This sounds like a great collection - however, I see they are sold separately on Kindle.

I have read Possession and The Biographer´s tale some 10-15 years ago - I attempted to read them in English but had to give up, there was just too much looking up words in the dictionary for it to be enjoyable. Possibly, I´d do better now as my English has improved a lot. Her language is pretty advanced.

Priya said...

Viktoria Berg - It took me a month each to read The Children's Book and Possession; you're right, the language is complex! I can't seem to find The Biographer's Tale at any bookstore.
It's unfortunate that you couldn't find the collection on Kindle; her short stories are much better and easier to get through than the novels!

Delia D said...

What a great review!
I remember reading the story and thinking, was that thing in the forest real or perhaps a metaphor for something else?
Byatt's prose is wonderful, if a little challenging at first. I really enjoyed Possession and will probably read more of her work.

Priya said...

Delia - I know! Byatt's works are always so full of hidden meanings and symbols - it's interesting to figure them out. In this story, I found how the 'thing' in the forest affected the girls and how they lost their innocence very touching - considering when the story was set and how the children were sent there expressly to be safe and stay innocent and away from the terror of the war.
Glad you stopped by. :)

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