Sunday, September 22, 2013

Joyland by Stephen King

Summary: Saying Joyland by Stephen King is a mix of a horror story and a crime novel wouldn't be quite right: it's the kind of book that you couldn't squeeze into one genre. It is about twenty-one year old, mopey, just-broken-up-with-his-first-love Devin Jones who does a summer job at an amusement park, Joyland (where they sell fun.) On his first day, two mysterious things happen. One: Madame Fortuna, the resident fortune teller and an apparent psychic, predicts that Devin would meet two important children during his work at Joyland, one of them with the Sight. Two: Devin hears of the ghost that haunts the park's only dark ride, Horror House. A little sleuthing leads him to the tragic murder of Linda Gray, by a man who slit her throat and dumped her in the darkest part of the amusement ride; the murderer was never caught. Intrigued by the stories, slightly suicidal after his break-up, Devin finds himself turning his summer stint at Joyland into a full time job. And that is when he meets Annie Ross and her ten-year-old, Mike, who knows he is going to die, just the way he somehow knows so many other things.

My thoughts: This book was so sweet. It reminded me of how 11.22.63 made me feel at the end and if you've read it, you'll know what I mean. It was deeply moving. Joyland was another one of those reads that show that Stephen King writes more than 'scary stories'. This was not another book of gory monsters written for those with the emotional range of a teaspoon (know who said that? give yourself a pat on the back!) Nor just another whodunit where the story ends fair and happy when the smart detective figures out who the killer is.

The book was written in a nostalgic tone, as Devin, now old described the most memorable times of his youth. It was almost ruefully funny at times and sad and scary, at others. I adored Mike, the little crippled boy so full of hope. In a way, he might have reminded me of Danny Torrance (so many other Goodreads reviewers say the same thing) for his ability, but somehow he left a much greater impression on me. I liked the people of Joyland, all strange, hilarious and thoroughly lovable; from Fortuna to the owner, the cute old man Bradley Easterbrook. Not to mention, Tom Kennedy and Erin Cook; the young promises and friendships were wonderfully dealt with. Throughout, I could visualize Joyland and its carny lingo, its employees taking turns at 'wearing the fur' and being Happy Howie, the German shepherd mascot, the spooky lore and the large Ferris wheel, Carolina Spin, which made you feel like you were flying. The mystery itself was noirish and played out roughly: the 'answer' which ought to satisfy you, just left me drained.

Mostly, Joyland by Stephen King was a gritty, brutally honest coming-of-age novel. Read it as a book about growing up and tackling life as it comes, and you might love it.

I read this because I finally found it, yay. But also maybe for the R.I.P. Challenge. I'm just biding time now till my copy of Dr. Sleep arrives.

7 comments:

harish p i said...

Saw it on library shelf. Planning to read it next.

Naida said...

This sounds like great King. I have heard it's nostalgic. I plan on reading it too. Nice review!

Priya said...

Harish - Great, hope you like it!

Naida - Thanks for stopping by. It really is great, do read it. :)

FICTION STATE OF MIND said...

I really liked Joyland too! King continues to use the young kid with powers angle but it's always wonderfully done :)

Priya said...

FICTION STATE OF MIND - That's so true! All the kids in his books are actually pretty well-written. Thanks for stopping by!

Lynn said...

I have seen so many good reviews for this book that I'm quite literally dying to read it!
Thanks for this review.
Lynn :D

Priya said...

Lynn - Hope you get around it it! Thanks for stopping by. :)

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