Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Writing about Writing about writing!

Hasn't every writer written sometime or another, about writing itself. You know, like the art.

Like Elmore Leonard, for instance (whom I only know as the guy Stephen King called "the great American writer"), in his Elmore Leonard's Ten Rules of Writing:

Easy on the Adverbs, Exclamation Points and Especially Hooptedoodle (I wasn't keen on reading it till I read the last word of the title. Do read the article!):


"Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue. The line of dialogue belongs to the character; the verb is the writer sticking his nose in. But said is far less intrusive than grumbled, gasped, cautioned, lied. I once noticed Mary McCarthy ending a line of dialogue with “she asseverated,” and had to stop reading to get the dictionary."

I had to, too! In case you're curious, it means "to affirm"!

John Grisham keeps it (a bit too) simple. He tells young ambitious budding writers to write a page a day as a hobby, for starters! Does it work? You wish. I have done that since I was like three. Have you ever seen me write anything even remotely resembling awesome crime fiction? Sigh.

After reading a bunch of other rules by a bunch of other famous writers, I felt like I had accidentally stepped into the world of the ever useful self-help books. Of course, then I read what Neil Gaiman had to say:

"The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you're allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it's definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I'm not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter."

This was the least helpful (i.e You don't get the kind of help from this that you naturally begin to expect in the world of self-help books - even though that help isn't really help, but you just don't realize this while you're still in that world!) and the most helpful (i.e It brought me back from the world of self-help books to the normal world, where it is actually the 'self' that helps the 'self'!) So, this, as far as I am concerned, makes the most sense. What about you?

Need a Cliffs Notes version to make some sense of this seemingly random ramble? Want to be a writer?

Writing is a good place to start. Off you go!

Unless, of course, you still have that little spark left in you, that tells you there might just be something you left out. Like a secret ingredient that will make you an awesome writer, or something. In that case, do what I'm doing, though I'm not doing it for that reason. *vehemently shakes head*

Reading "On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft" by Stephen King. An autobiography and writing guide, which might as well end up on my "Favourite Books Ever" list!

Blog Award!

Now for the note attached, let's see here...

1. Thank and link to the person who nominated you.
2. Share seven random facts about yourself.
3. Pass the award along to 15 deserving blog buddies.
4. Contact those buddies to congratulate them.

I'd be lying if I said I wasn't shocked - no one has ever called my blog 'irresistibly sweet' before!! And just look how yummy that award is! I-Want-That-Cake.

Thanks, Vanessa @ Love, Laugh & Read for the very sweet award! Do check out her site, it's great!!

Now for the hard part. I really do appreciate this, don't get me wrong, but I am just not the blog-awards kind of person, if there is any. So say 'hullo' and 'buh-bye' to my first and last award! I write random facts about myself all over my blog, and none of them are particularly interesting. I can think of many blogs that I love, but I am not the blog-award-giving person either; so I'll show my appreciation for your blogs by stopping and dropping a lot of comments. Thanks :)

Tuesday Memes



Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Grab your current read, open to a random page and share two teaser sentences from that page!

My teaser this week is from a science fiction book called Strata by Terry Pratchett. It is one of his first novels, and is sort of a prequel to the Discworld. Kin Arad, who is more than a couple of centuries old, works for a Company that designs planets. She is recruited, along with others, on an expedition to a miraculously odd planet - a flat earth! Here's my teaser:

"We build worlds, we don't just terraform planets. Robots could do that. We build places where the imagination of human beings can find an anchor."

__________________________________________________________

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. Each week there will be a new Top Ten list complete with one bloggers’ answers. This week's topic:

Top Ten Books That Should Be In A Beach Bag - Your perfect beach reads!

Where I read isn't really an issue. The only things I wouldn't like to read on a beach are books about terrifying sea monsters and people stranded on islands. Here's my top ten anyway:

1. Any Harry Potter book - J.K Rowling: There is nowhere in the world I'd say no to reading this!

2. Life of Pi - Yann Martel: It has the ocean, but not the scary monsters, so that's ok!

3. Marley and Me - John Grogan: Just the type of pure fun the beach calls for!

4. Good Omens - Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman: Another book I could read anywhere!

5. Three Men In A Boat - Jerome K. Jerome: I die laughing every time I read this - it has the perfect plot for a beach trip!!

6. Papillon - Henry Charrière: It's been a long time since I read this one, and I'd love to read it again!

7. M is for Magic - Neil Gaiman: Awesome, funny short stories!!

8. Discworld books starring Death - Terry Pratchett: Mort, Reaper Man, Hogfather, etc!

9. Howl's Moving Castle - Dianna Wynne Jones: One of the most fun books ever!!

10. The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafón: For after I get tired of laughing!

Monday, May 30, 2011

Happy Birthday, Blog!

After 82 posts, 591 comments, 70 followers and 13,125 hits - today my blog turned one. All the numbers don't really matter to me - they just shocked the hell out of me is all!

From silly jokes and making fun of everything (and everyone!), to talking about cats, doodling and writing incessantly about books - this blog has been through a LOT.

It's been a great year - what with bugging my friends all the time about my latest blog post and wondering what to blog about next during class! "Tabula Rasa" has been with me through good and bad - mostly good! Thanks to the people who made my blog happen and my (if any) patient readers! This calls for a huge celebration!

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Book Blogger Hop #2

Book Blogger Hop is a weekly meme hosted by Crazy for Books. The Hop lasts Friday-Monday every week, so if you don't have time to Hop today, you can join the fun later! This is a weekly event! And stop back throughout the weekend to see all the new blogs that are added!
This week's question:

"What book-to-movie adaption have you most liked? Which have you disliked?"

I can think of very few movies based on books that I liked. One movie I really loved was Silence of the Lambs. Another movie version that I loved was Stephen King's Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption. I can't say the same for the rest of his books though! The Shining for instance; they did a horrible job with the characters in that movie!

I liked the first two Harry Potter movies, but the Prisoner of Azkaban movie was nightmarish - no Marauders' story, a demented looking guy as Sirius; they took away my favourite parts of the book - except the Boggart lesson! And the movies after that were just as absurd! I hated the Half Blood Prince; it's as if they rounded up the most important parts of the book and replaced them with stupid, unnecessary stuff! The Deathly Hallows was okay though!

By the way, I just finished reading Howl's Moving Castle (it's awesome!) and I am so sure I won't like that Japanese animated film based on it that I am not going to watch it!

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Teaser Tuesday #9


Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

  • This week, I have two teasers from two books from the Chronicles of Chrestomanci series by Diana Wynne Jones. I love the series!


    Witch Week by Dianna Wynne Jones:
    "She held the end of the broom handle in both hands and tried to point it at the town. But the broom had other ideas. It wanted to go around the edge of the town.
    Larwood House is a children's boarding school. Many students are supposedly witch orphans, but no one knows who the witches are. In this alternate world, witchcraft is illegal and witches are burnt at stake. This story begins when someone in class 6B writes a note to one of the teachers: "Someone in this class is a witch.
    _______________________________________________________________________________

    Conrad's Fate by Dianna Wynne Jones:
    “I hate Gregor,” I said while we were going down in the lift with the shoe basket. “You couldn’t do some magic to make him fall face first into the sandwiches at Tea, could you?”
    (...) “It’s tempting,” Christopher said.
    Conrad Tesdinic is told that he has bad karma, and sent to work at the Stallery Mansion to cure it. There, he befriends a certain Christopher Smith. Christopher has a secret - he is a powerful nine lived enchanter from another world, here in search of his friend Millie. Together, Conrad and Christopher find her, and while doing that expose a big fraud going on at the Mansion.

    Tuesday, May 24, 2011

    Top Ten Tuesday #4


    Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. Each week there will be a new Top Ten list complete with one bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. This week's topic:

    Top Ten Books I Have Lied About (lied about reading, lied about NOT reading, lied about liking/disliking, etc....dish your dirty secrets!!)


    Incidentally, there aren't any books that I lied about reading one or the other time that I didn't finish reading later! Just saying... ;)

    1. Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris: I lied about not reading it. I read only the first book of the series, and I hated it, of course - but just the fact that I dared to read it after watching the series is something.

    2. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho: I lied about liking it. I thought it was horrible and pointless, but since people in my high school almost worshiped that book I pretended to like it for quite some time!

    3. Moby Dick by Herman Melville: I lied about reading it. I mean, I did read it, but I kind of skipped through many parts and I don't particularly remember the ending. To tell you the truth, I don't regret not reading it!

    4. Catcher in the Rye by J.D Sallinger: I lied about liking it. I found it kind of irritating and a bit boring.

    5. God Delusion by Richard Dawkins: Ok, this one was bad. I lied about reading it, originally. I'd only read about half of it. But then I got so guilty, I did finish reading the whole thing a few months later!

    6. Twilight series by Stephanie Meyer: I lied about hating it at first. I mean, I did find the writing terribly dull, I just liked the concept; because I had read very little fantasy fiction till then. *shudders*

    7. Agatha Christie: I lied about loving her books. I only 'liked' them - and only a few. I think she's sort of overrated.

    8. The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien: I lied about reading it. Sort of. I borrowed it from my friend, read it halfway through, and lied about reading it for about half a year. After that I did finish reading it. I hated it back then. Right now I'm re-reading it. And I'm loving it, but I haven't told anyone that. Does that count too?

    9. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank: I lied about liking it. I mean, it's great that she was actually there in the war and she suffered a lot and all; but is too odd that I hate reading people's diaries? I'm sorry she died, but come on, she was so immature and whiny.

    10. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K Rowling: Save the worst for last. I lied about loving it as much as the other six books. I didn't quite!

    Saturday, May 21, 2011

    The Chronicles of Chrestomanci

    The Chrestomanci Chronicles is an awesome fantasy series by British writer Diana Wynne Jonnes. I started and finished with Volume I (first two novels) yesterday, and I'm reading Volume II right now! And you know a book has got to be awesome, when Neil Gaiman calls it "...always perfectly magical."

    If anything big happens in history, like a war or an earthquake; something that might have two or more possible outcomes, reality splits and two or more worlds are created! Presently, there are hundreds of such parallel worlds existing together. Volume I is set in a world pretty much like ours, except that magic is freely practised and it is a bit old fashioned. Chrestomanci is the title given to the nine lived magician/ enchanter who controls the magic of all the parallel/related worlds.

    The first novel is called Charmed Life, and it is about two little siblings, Cat and Gwendolen and the time they spend at the Chrestomanci Castle. Gwendolen is a powerful but stubborn witch, whereas Cat seems to be just a normal boy, who has to suffer because of his sister's ill-doings. Soon she runs to another world, and sends back her counterpart from that world as a replacement - leaving Cat to deal with her mess. While the story is pretty exciting, we get to know little about the Chrestomanci.

    The next novel makes up for it. The Lives of Christopher Chant is about the little boy who is an enchanter, has nine lives, and can travel to the related worlds in his dreams. And he has no idea what a powerful magician he is! We see him get involved in a gang of wizards who smuggle rare magical materials from the other worlds, befriend a goddess, and eventually, study to grow up and become the next Chrestomanci (the same mysterious man we first see in the Charmed Life).

    Reading this was almost like Harry Potter all over again. It is funny, the characters are fascinating, the plots are exciting and the imagery is just magical! The stories are full of twists and turns and surprises, and though the book seems a teenie bit childish at times, it is pretty fun! I'd recommend it to anyone in a heartbeat!!

    Friday, May 20, 2011

    Book Blogger Hop




    My first time at Book Blogger Hop - It is a weekly meme hosted by Crazy for Books. The Hop lasts Friday-Monday every week, so if you don't have time to Hop today, you can join the fun later! This is a weekly event! And stop back throughout the weekend to see all the new blogs that are added!
    This week's question:

    "If you were given the chance to spend one day in a fictional world (from a book), which book would it be from and what would that place be?"


    Hogsmeade Village - Harry Potter!

    I had a hard time choosing between the Discworld and the Wizarding world - but there's hardly anything more tempting than Honeydukes.
    I'd love to visit and meet everyone in Hogsmeade (except Madam Pudifoot's of course), and you can always just sneak into Hogwarts from there.


    Wednesday, May 18, 2011

    TT#8 Lord of the Flies

    Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page

  • Share two “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!
  • My teaser this week is from Lord of the Flies by William Golding. A group of little boys are stranded on an island. At first, they seem excited about living on their own and being rescued. Soon as they lose touch with the real world, they lose hope, begin to show their weaknesses and descend into a pre-civilized behaviour, the kind that turns them from little innocent children into savage adults.

    "They're all dead," said Piggy, "an' this is an island. Nobody don't know we're here. Your dad don't know, nobody don't know--"

    His lips quivered and the spectacles were dimmed with mist.

    "We may stay here till we die."

    Tuesday, May 17, 2011

    Top Ten Favourite Minor Characters in Books



    Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. Each week there will be a new Top Ten list complete with one bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. This week's topic:

    Top Ten Favorite Minor Characters (all those great supporting characters or VERY minor characters that had an effect on you)

    1. Gellert Grindelwald (Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling) - Okay, so we do know a lot about him - but only through Dumbledore, and a dead Dumbledore at that! He's not just on the list because I love the dark, mysterious air of Dumbledore's shocking past - though that's the main reason! We first know about on the Chocolate Frog card in the first book, and at the end we know the whole story! Grindelwald is sort of scarily awesome - just like Voldemort.

    2. The Death of Rats (Discworld - Terry Pratchett) - It is a rat skeleton, walking on its hind legs, wearing a black robe and carrying a teenie scythe. It is just an aspect of Death that is allowed to have a separate existence! It is called the Grim Squeaker. You don't really know what this guy's saying, because its vocabulary consists of "Squeaks" and "Eeks"(all spoken directly into people's minds due to lack of any real voice, all in small caps font!)


    3. The Luggage (Discworld - Terry Pratchett) - The large chest, with thousands of tiny legs, that follows its owner wherever he goes, and swallows people that annoy it. What's not to like? No one really knows what happens to the people it 'eats up' and no one knows exactly how The Luggage came into existence. The Luggage is the most absurdly imaginative character ever! I love it!!

    4. QT1 "Cutie" (I, Robot - Isaac Asimov) - The robot that begins to believe in a higher power! He's a highly advanced model with great intellectual capacity, using which, he convinces himself that it is impossible for mere humans to have created him. He begins to believe in a Master and proclaims himself as His prophet. Sound familiar? Before you know it, the new 'religion' spreads throughout the station and the robots refuse to take orders from the humans!

    5. Fermin Romero de Torres (The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon) - I loved this character! And specially his overwhelming sense of humour! A beggar, who is an ex-soldier with a terrifying past, who later works at Daniel's father's shop and goes on to become his great and loyal friend! He is kind of childish, but terribly funny and has the best lines!!


    6. Professor McGonagall (Harry Potter - J.K. Rowling) - You know, it's really hard to choose favourites in Harry Potter. I don't really consider Hagrid, Sirius, Neville, Luna, Dobby as minor characters. I like Minerva McGonagall of all the professors, and she's a 'minor' character, because we don't really know much about her. But she is one of the 'good guys', she can turn into a cat, and Transfiguration is one of my favourite Hogwarts subjects!!

    7. Dog - The Hellhound (Good Omens - Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman) - He is sent from hell, a ferocious beast, to be the young Antichrist's protector. On earth, however, he becomes a small terrier! His name is Dog and despite himself, he loves being and acting like a small dog - chasing rats and jumping around and yapping at cats.

    8. Francis Adirubasamy (Life of Pi - Yann Martel) - Pi's "Mamaji", a close friend of the Patel family, he not only teaches Pi to swim but is also the one to tell the author the story! He is a world class swimmer and names Piscine "Pi" Patel after his favourite swimming pool in France. I loved his swimming lessons with Pi and his family, and the fact that Ravi calls him "Mr. Fish"!


    9. The Cat (Coraline - Neil Gaiman) - It has no name because cats don't need names to tell each other apart. It's Coraline's guide in the Other World, where it has no counterpart because cats can keep themselves together. The clever, sarcastic and slightly smug black cat is my favourite character from that book (there aren't many good ones to choose from!)

    10. Jeremiah de Saint-Amour (Love in the Time of Cholera - Gabriel García Márquez) - Not my favourite book, but I liked it at the start; where Jeremiah is a prominent character. While he is not important to the actual story, I love how we get insight into the book's main characters through him. I found it kind of fascinating!

    Wednesday, May 11, 2011

    Top Ten Tuesday #2


    Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. Each week there will be a new Top Ten list complete with one bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join.

    This week's topic:
    Top Ten Jerks In Literature

    By the way, these aren't in order of liking, of course!

    1. Henry Chinaski - The Post Office/Ham on Rye/Factotum/Barfly-the movie (etc...) (Charles Bukowski) The bitterly honest semi-autobiographical anti-hero. Not that he's "lovable" or anything, but with his dark humour and straightforwardness, he does seem kind of cool. To an objective viewer, of course.


    2. Jonathan Teatime - Hogfather - Discworld series (Terry Pratchett) "It’s pronounced Tee – Ah – Tim – Eh,” said Mister Teatime. And he doesn't like it when you pronounce it otherwise. Teatime's an absurdly cruel assassin. His eyes make his boyish handsomeness disappear in an instant: he has one glass eye, and one off-white eye, with a pinhole sized pupil. Not to mention, he is a genius.

    3. Jack Torrance - The Shining (Stephen King) Jack Torrance is a classic jerk. He is scary and has a horrible temper. Not to mention, he is an alcoholist. The struggling writer may be the ultimate antagonist for the sake of the story, but all you really feel for him is pity. Either way, Jack Torrance is an amazingly built character!

    4. Michael Corleone - The Godfather/The Sicilian (Mario Puzo) The youngest son of Don Vito Corleone does make a very likable jerk! He is cunningly intelligent, strong and loyal to the family. He is bold, violent and ambitious and it is kind of awesome how he goes from being totally uninvolved in his "family business" to being a cold-blooded Mafia don, and his father's successor.


    5. Tom Riddle - Need I even say? Fine, Harry Potter series ( J.K Rowling) It is a gross understatement to call Voldemort a jerk! But the charming, brilliant student who had a taste for the Dark Arts, who had followers right from school and who went on to become the darkest, most evil and powerful wizard ever. That's right, Tom Riddle fits the description perfectly.

    6. Anthony Crowley - Good Omens (Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett) He is actually a demon. But Crowley(in his human form)- with the dark hair and sunglasses, his 1926 black Bentley (which he loves), a posh flat in London, his love for high end technological gadgets, and his dark humour- has to be the best jerk ever!

    7. Lestat de Loincourt - The Vampire Chronicles (Anne Rice) Ah, the 'Brat Prince'. He is amazing looking, bold and defiant, but also a loner. He is charismatic, loves literature, is the lead singer in a rock band, is a fashionista and loves being a vampire. What more can you say?


    8. Patrick Bateman - American Psycho (Bret Easton Ellis) "Facelessand desensitized, bereft of love, family or real friends, Bateman is obsessed by physical perfection and preoccupied by the obsession to fit in." I haven't finished reading the book, but Bateman is gruesome and a complete jerk, but kind of awesome anyway. And if that's not enough, well, think of Christian Bale!

    9. Lord Vetinari - Discworld series (Terry Pratchett) Lord Havelock Vetinari is the Patrician of the city of Ankh-Morpork. He is a tall, pale man, who incidentally always wears black (since he has better things to think about than clothes.)

    10. Severus Snape - Harry Potter series (J. K Rowling) How could I have possibly missed Snape? He is the biggest jerk on the planet, really! For someone who can manage to love a person years after they are dead, he is mean. But believe me, his pathetic love story is not the reason why I like him. It is that "Half-blood Prince" in him I like; his crazy intelligence and his endless fascination for the Dark Arts!

    Teaser Tuesday #7

    Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page

  • Share two “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

  • "In the warm, horsey gloom of the stable, Death's pale horse looked up from its oats and gave a little whinny of greeting. The horse's name was Binky. He was a real horse. Death had tried fiery steeds and skeletal horses in the past, and found them impractical, especially the fiery ones, which tended to set light to their own bedding and stand in the middle of it looking embarrassed."

    - The Reaper Man (Discworld series), Terry Pratchett

    The Reaper Man is the 11th novel in the Discworld series -a humorous fantasy series- by Terry Pratchett; but Discworld really isn't the kind of series you have to read in a particular order! And I've heard The Reaper Man is a great way to begin reading the series!!

    Death is one of my, if not my most, favourite Discworld characters! He is a seven foot tall skeleton in a black robe and carries a very sharp scythe. He likes cats and he only talks in booming CAPITAL LETTERS (he technically has no voice, so what he says directly enters people's minds, without ever being spoken!) Death is never portrayed as cruel or ruthless, just very efficient.

    In The Reaper Man, Death is suspended from his duty, as he is beginning to develop a personality. He then begins a mortal life on a farm, calling himself Mr. Bill Door (he isn't very creative when it comes to names!) As there is now no Grim Reaper, there is no place for the dead to go! This results in a very chaotic turn of events on the Disc; a lot of dead people just seem to hang around on the Disc as walking dead bodies! In the end, of course, it all turns out fine: but you'll have to read the book to know how :)

    Sunday, May 8, 2011

    Happy Mother's Day :)

    I am not, as I say time and again, the kind of person that celebrates any of the 'days'! But Google's adorable Mother's Day doodle just melted my heart!

    I mean, just look at it! Very cute :) So. It was Google that inspired this post, and not just because of the doodle. You see, it was Google itself that informed me that there are more "Mother's Day: Worst Moms in Fiction" lists than the best! (Try Google-ing it yourself!) Which is obviously not how it should be, specially on Mother's day. So here's my list of the 5 best moms in fiction!:

    5. Nanny Ogg: From the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. She is a good witch and is easily the most powerful of the bunch, but she'd rather have a laugh instead. Nanny Ogg is a round and happy person whom everyone loves! She is fun loving, and she definitely has a very motherly air to her, which isn't a surprise considering she has fifteen children and tonnes of grandchildren!

    4. Bambi's mother: Considering how many animated films I watch (the answer is thousands, by the way) I had to include an animated character! She is one of my favourites from the Walt Disney movie Bambi. I love how she takes care of the 'little prince' Bambi, protective and sweet, just like a mother should be!

    3. Joyce Summers: From Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I liked her and felt horrible when she died. I mean, you really have to be a great mum to deal the way she did with one of your daughters having super powers, and the other one being a supernatural entity! Special mommy moment: when she hits Spike with an axe in School Hard, saying "You get the hell away from my daughter"!

    2. Lorelai Gilmore: I know, it's kind of clichéd to have her on the list. But come on, she is kind of awesome, even for a 30-something mom living in a tremendously irritating small town. You can see she really loves Rory; and it's not just the the whole mother-daughter-friendship thing, she also always manages to crack you up!

    1. Molly Weasley: Mrs. Weasley belongs to the awesome food-cooking, jumper-knitting, loving and worrying variety of moms that are kind of the reason why we celebrate Mother's day! She is as good as moms can get. Not to mention, the "Not my daughter, you bitch" moment she had with Bellatrix Lestrange, before killing her; which made her doubly awesome!

    Deserving a special mention here, is Fly the sheep dog from Babe, my favourite movie as a kid. She adopts the pig as her own son and proves to be the sweetest adoptive mother a pig could have dreamed of! And there's Mrs. March from Little Women, of course!
    I could have just added them to the list. But a list of seven just doesn't look as cool as a list of five.

    Also deserving a special mention is my mother, who wouldn't really be pleased at the thought of getting a special mention on my blog in the middle of the night, when I am supposed to be asleep. But here's the special mention, anyway! And another proud mother of...11? 12? I'm not sure! Yes, you're right. Look to the left, presenting to you the best mommy cat in the world!!

    Happy Mother's Day, people!

    Tuesday, May 3, 2011

    TT#6 Love in the Time of Cholera

    Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page

  • Share two “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

  • Love in the Time of Cholera is a Spanish novel written by Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez. The English translation is written by Alfred A. Knopf. I have been meaning to read this book for ages and finally started reading it a couple of days back. I am halfway done, and I have to say, if it were upto me I would have called it "Death in the Time of Cholera"; too many people die way too soon!! Either way, I sort of like the book; it doesn't have too much sorrow or the depressing things I was expecting. It has a tinge of humour to it, and the language is beautiful!

    Here's my teaser: (only two sentences, for a change!)

    A long time ago, on a deserted beach in Haiti where the two of them lay naked after love, Jeremiah de Saint Amour had sighed: “I will never be old.” She interpreted this as a heroic determination to struggle without quarter against the ravages of time, but he was more specific: he had made the irrevocable decision to take his own life when he was seventy years old.