Thursday, August 12, 2010

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon


Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem.
Which is Latin and it means
No more things should be presumed to exist than are absolutely necessary.
I haven't been reading much lately; at least not anything really good. But that was until yesterday, when I read a book called : The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon. You may have already heard of this book - it was a huge success when it was released and was on many bestseller lists for quite a long time. I hadn't - but now that I have read it, I would strongly recommend it.

The book is actually supposed to be a detective storybook that the main character, a fifteen year old boy named Christopher, writes. The boy suffers from something like the Asperger's syndrome; while he can interact with the world when necessary and can communicate, he has some autistic traits like intense dislike of being touched. Christopher often gets side tracked from writing the mystery which makes the book a bit like a personal journal than a novel. Since the book is written from Christopher's point of view, it provides a completely different perspective on the world. Christopher cannot understand other people's emotions - he never mentions how things make him feel(other than physically). That gives the book a lot of emotional blanks that the reader has to fill in himself, which creates a more personal attachment to the book. Usually in a narrative style book, the reader tends to identify himself with the narrator. In this book, I found myself identifying more with the other characters in the story. Watching both Christopher and everyone in his life trying to bridge the emotional gap between them makes the book very real and very heartbreaking.

Christopher's fascination and understanding of mathematics and logic, his staunch dislike for metaphors (like he says, even the word metaphor - which literally means carrying something from one place to another- is a metaphor) are some of the things that added the necessary humour to the book. I grew very fond of Christopher's frequent use of drawings; and not to mention, his love for prime numbers.

Let me end with one of my favourite quotes from the book:

"I think prime numbers are like life. They are very logical but you could never work out the rules, even if you spent all your time thinking about them"

1 comments:

comicbooknerd said...

I read this book it's nice. Adored the little guy!

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